THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

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THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

THE GREENHOUSE PROJECT

Established in 1922, the University Mound Nursery grew heirloom varietals of roses in 18 hothouses at 770 Woolsey Street for sale throughout San Francisco. The “Rose Factory” as it was once known is the last remaining of the original 19 blocks of family-owned nurseries in Portola, the “Garden District” of San Francisco. The historic site has been dormant since nursery operations ceased in the 1990’s.

SITELAB working on behalf of local non-profit, The Greenhouse Project (TGP), developed a feasibility study to revive the 2.2-acre parcel into an Urban Farm Center. TGP envisions 770 Woolsey as a neighborhood activator that, through thriving commercial farming activity and inclusive public programming, supports sustainability, health, innovation, and community-centered growth. SITELAB prepared multiple development scenarios coordinating programming, design vision, construction costs, and financing strategies to provide a series of phased options for implementation. The program responds to extensive research on urban agriculture models that demonstrate an economically-sustainable operating model based on strategic land allocation for different production methods combined with community programming and event rental space. Community events, facilitated in tandem with the study, provided further input and demonstrated the strong support for transforming this last block of greenhouses into a working farm and community hub.

Client: The Greenhouse Project